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Building Advantaged Capabilities: Missing Link Between Strategy and Impact

An organization’s competitive position is enabled by its ability to perform at a high level in differentiated ways; in short, its strategic success is enabled by distinctive organizational capabilities. In today’s dynamic world, we face the ongoing need to identify and develop new capabilities to respond to changing customer demands or competitive threats. Failing to do so can put an organization at risk of becoming obsolete.

But we are familiar with some organizations’ laments concerning their past investments in capability building that failed to yield strategic impact or faltered after achieving early gains. This is often experienced even by organizations that recognize the importance of investing in traditional change management activities.

The problem lies not with today's managers, but with the particular challenges posed by strategic organizational capabilities. By their very nature, the capabilities that underpin sustainable competitive advantage are distinctive, multi-dimensional and hard to replicate. Unfortunately this also means they are hard to build. What can you do to better identify and build the strategic organizational capabilities you need to become leaders in your industry?

During this live interactive webcast that aired on June 11, 2013, Monitor Deloitte thought leaders Bruce Chew, Erin Bradford and Robert Lurie drew on research and experience to present their latest eminence work, covering:

  • The role strategic organizational capabilities play in bridging strategy and impact
  • Four essentials leaders should follow to build strategic organizational capabilities
  • How to recognize specific challenges organizations face when launching capability development initiatives
  • How to approach integrating new ways of thinking and working into an organization’s existing systems

Click here to download the slides of the webcast.

Presenters

Bruce Chew, Director, Deloitte Consulting LLP
Bruce Chew is a director at Monitor Deloitte, Deloitte Consulting LLP’s strategy consulting practice. His work focuses on strategy development and implementation and the building of strategic organizational capabilities. Over the past twenty years, Bruce has worked on those issues with government agencies and firms across a broad range of industries.

Erin Bradford, Principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP
Erin Bradford is a principal at Monitor Deloitte, Deloitte Consulting LLP’s strategy consulting practice. Erin’s work focuses on capability building and human capital. She has served clients in a variety of industries, including agriculture, automotive, biotech, consumer goods, government, industrials, manufacturing, medical devices and pharmaceuticals.

Robert Lurie, Director, Deloitte Consulting LLP
Robert Lurie is a director at Monitor Deloitte, Deloitte Consulting LLP’s strategy consulting practice. He is focused on helping clients accelerate growth through both ‘top down’ and ‘bottom up’ efforts. Over the past twenty years, he has worked in a range of industries, including consumer durables and packaged goods, chemicals and materials, financial services and engineered products.

About Deloitte
Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee, and its network of member firms, each of which is a legally separate and independent entity. Please see www.deloitte.com/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited and its member firms. Please see www.deloitte.com/us/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting.

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