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IT business balance survey 2011

Learn how to improve alignment between business and IT

IT business balance survey 2011

To achieve superior results, business and Information technology (IT) must be closely aligned. That means:

  • Coordinating business and IT strategies
  • Working together at every level of the organization
  • Developing IT staff who understand business needs
  • Getting business people involved in designing and implementing new IT systems
  • And measuring IT performance based on business value

Deloitte recently conducted a global survey of IT and business alignment that included more than 800 respondents from 37 countries. The results show that Canadian organizations tend to be ahead of the pack when it comes to alignment practices. Compared to their counterparts in other countries, business and IT leaders in Canada seem to work well together. And they do a relatively good job linking IT strategy to business strategy. Also, Canadian organizations tend to be more satisfied with their primary IT outsourcing agreements—perhaps because they review and align their vendor agreements more frequently.

One critical area where Canadian organizations fall a bit short is measuring IT performance and demonstrating value. In Canada, performance management processes tend to be less formal than elsewhere, and organizations are less able to demonstrate the business value of their IT investments. 

Read the full global report below to learn more about how Canadian organizations can improve alignment between business and IT—and how they stack up against their global peers.

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