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Connected barrels: Transforming oil and gas strategies with the Internet of Things

The Internet of things in the oil and gas industry

In the oil and gas industry, the promise of IoT applications lies not with managing existing assets, supply chains, or customer relationships but, rather, in creating new value in information about these. An integrated deployment strategy is key for O&G companies looking to find value in IoT technology.


Written by:

  • Christian Grant 
  • John McCue
  • Rob Young

The authors would like to thank Suzanna Sanborn, senior manager, and Joseph Mariani, lead analyst, Market Insights, Deloitte Services LP; Michael Raynor, director, Deloitte Consulting LLP; and Andrew Slaughter, executive director of Deloitte’s Center for Energy Solutions, Deloitte Services LP, for their review, feedback, and support throughout the research and drafting process. 

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