This site uses cookies to provide you with a more responsive and personalized service. By using this site you agree to our use of cookies. Please read our cookie notice for more information on the cookies we use and how to delete or block them.

Bookmark Email Print this page

2012 U.S. Survey of Health Care Consumers

Five year anniversary of the survey


DOWNLOAD  

In the health care industry, physicians call consumers “patients;” health plans call them “enrollees” or “members;” and bio-pharma companies refer to them as “users” or, sometimes, “subjects” if they are involved in a clinical trial. Many of the designations in health care infer that individuals play a primarily passive or reactionary role.

Since 2008, the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions has annually polled up to 4,000 U.S. adult consumers about their interest in and ability to operate in a consumer health care market. These surveys queried adults in various age, health status, income, and insurance cohorts to gauge the degree to which consumers are prepared to engage with the health care system as “patients” or “consumers.” The distinctions between the two are stark; the implications are transformative — not only to the health care industry, but to every U.S. household, company, and government agency.

Methodology

Since 2008, the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions has annually polled a nationally representative sample of the U.S. adult population (up to 4,000 U.S. consumers) on behaviors, attitudes, and unment needs in six zones:

  1. Wellness and healthy living
  2. Information sources
  3. Traditional health services
  4. Alternatives health services
  5. Health insurance
  6. Health policy

These online surveys queried adults in varied health status, income, and insurance cohorts to gauge the degree to which consumers are prepared to engage the health care system as “patients” or “consumers.” Results are weighted to ensure proportional representation to the nation’s population with respect to age, gender, income, race/ethnicity, and geography. There was a margin of error for national estimates of +/- 1.6 percent.

 

Related links

Share this page

Email this Send to LinkedIn Send to Facebook Tweet this More sharing options

Stay connected